menopause

Fixing Chronic Fatigue with Shelley Gawith

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Shelley Gawith is a Functional Nutritionist in private practice in Wellington, New Zealand. She completed Nutritional Therapy Association studies, IHS Advanced Functional Assessment Training, and is a Certified Gluten Practitioner. In this episode we talk about adrenal health, her amazing health history, and her work in helping busy career women overcome fatigue & anxiety.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 01:30 Introducing Shelley Gawith's work
Min 04:25 Shelley's health journey with chronic fatigue syndrome
Min 08:30 Shelley's steps to getting better
Min 12:10 Cellular energy & adrenal health
Min 16:40 Root causes of Shelley's health problems
Min 21:45 Work stress & its effects on the adrenals
Min 26:50 Shelley's advice for career women
Min 36:50 Hydrochloric acid
Min 39:05 Gulping water but getting dehydrated
Min 42:30 Using electrolytes
Min 47:40 Shelley's resources

To learn more about Shelley, visit her website here and follow her on social media:
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Resources:

Check out our summit recordings and programs at our shop.
31 Day Challenge 
Beautycounter products - non-toxic line of beauty products

Here's the video version of the interview with Shelley Gawith:

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If you have not yet joined our community, be sure take our "Is a Gut Infection Causing Your Hormonal Imbalance" quiz here, and come on board!

We have lots of valuable, free resources for women's health we share weekly.

Bridgit Danner,

Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

Create a Healthcare Revolution with Chris Kresser

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Chris Kresser is the founder of The Kresser Institute, co-director of The California Center for Functional Medicine, and author of the new book "Unconventional Medicine" as well as New York Times best seller "The Paleo Cure."

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 01:55 Introduction to Chris Kresser & his health history
Min 05:00 Chris Kresser's work & books
Min 06:25 The state of health care & chronic disease
Min 10:25 Working with health practitioners & the problem of insurance
Min 21:10 The pharmaceutical industry's influence & functional medicine
Min 26:25 Chris Kresser's clinical practice & programs
Min 33:50 Networking for health practitioners
Min 42:50 Chris Kresser's resources

To learn more about Chris Kresser, visit his website here and follow him on social media:
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Resources:

Get 50% off our Hormone Summit, Menopause Summit, & Perfect Periods Program using the code rock2018
Kresser Institute for practitioners
Beautycounter - non-toxic line of beauty products

Here's the video version of the interview with Chris Kresser:

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

If you have not yet joined our community, be sure take our "Is a Gut Infection Causing Your Hormonal Imbalance" quiz here, and come on board!

We have lots of valuable, free resources for women's health we share weekly.

Bridgit Danner,

Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

Using Chinese Medicine for Hormone Balance with Dr. Eric Karchmer

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Dr. Eric Karchmer is a doctor of Chinese medicine and co-founder of DAO Labs. In this episode we talk about his clinical experience, the concept of Chinese medicine and how it applies to women's health, and Chinese formulas.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 02:20 Introduction to Dr. Eric Karchmer & his education
Min 07:50 Dao Labs & Chinese medicine
Min 11:25 The concepts of Chinese medicine for women's cycles
Min 19:20 Eating cold food
Min 21:45 Blood deficiency & Dao Labs' formulas
Min 29:10 Formulas for perimenopause & menopause
Min 36:50 Selling formulas directly to consumers
Min 43:10 Formulas for PMS
Min 44:40 Seeing & treating clients
Min 47:35 Sourcing for herbs & testing for purity

Private Coaching with Bridgit

Check out our current coaching options on our website HERE.

Resources:

To learn more about Dr. Eric Karchmer & DAO Labs, visit their website here and find them on social media:
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If you have not yet joined our community, be sure to grab our hidden Hormone stressors quiz here, and come on board!

Thanks for listening,

Bridgit Danner,

Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

How to Tackle Hormonal Mood Swings by Abby Quillen

There are certain body processes that are not under our control. Take hormones, for example: For women, essentials such as estrogen and progesterone help to regulate things like reproduction, growth, and metabolism. They’re necessary, and their levels are not something that anyone can regulate.

Hormones may cause women to feel differently based on different levels, but those changes do not have to be something that happens without awareness. In fact, understanding what’s going on in the body and why it’s happening is a good way to feel and be more in control.

Take menopause: Many women are taught to fear it because of how radically the body changes hormone levels. But in fact, many women experience menopause as a positive phase of life. Even so, it’s helpful to understand what negativity may happen and what women can do to understand it. This graphic helps explain those hormone fluctuations.
 

The Balancing Act

If you feel like your hormones are holding you hostage, here are some relatively simple lifestyle changes that may help.

1. Pay attention

Keep a diary of your symptoms for a few months. Every woman is different, and the only way to understand your moods is to record them and analyze the data. It may bring relief to observe that cyclical annoyances don’t usually last long.

2. Eat up

Studies suggest that women with PMS may be deficient in calcium and magnesium.

According to some experts, foods rich in vitamin B6, omega 3 fatty acids and zinc may help prevent mood swings. It can’t hurt to eat a more nutrient-dense diet. Reach for vegetables, leafy greens, beans, seeds, nuts, legumes, whole grains, poultry, seafood, seaweed and fish.

3. Improve your sleep habits

Some women report insomnia before menstruation, which is when estrogen and progesterone levels plummet. 40 to 50 percent of women experience insomnia during menopause. Women with sleep disturbances are more likely to feel stressed out, tense, anxious, or depressed. To improve your odds of a good night of sleep, make your room dark, quiet, and cool, and stick to routine sleep and waking times.

4. Move more

In one study, eight weeks of aerobic training significantly reduced participants’ premenstrual symptoms. Choose physical activities you enjoy since the point is to feel good.

5. Manage stress

Women who experience stress early in a menstrual cycle are more likely to experience mood swings later in the cycle, according to a study. Walking, mindfulness exercises, visiting nature, and hanging out with friends are proven ways to reduce stress.

6. Reduce caffeine and alcohol

In studies, caffeine has been shown to decrease feelings of relaxation and increase ratings of anxiousness, tenseness, and nervousness. Alcohol may interfere with estrogen detoxification (which could be why it’s associated with a higher risk of breast cancer). So reach for a drink such as water or herbal tea that will help you feel calm.

If you experience mood swings that interfere with your daily life and these healthy makeovers don’t help, it may be time to check in with your doctor or naturopath. Herbs like chaste tree and red clover, vitamin supplements or medical treatments may help.

Conclusion

Hormonal cycles should not be used to discount or discriminate against women or medicalize normal life changes. However, it doesn’t serve women to pretend their bodies and moods stay constant through the course of their lifetime. Whether the subject is menstruation, menopause, or moods, they should take their health seriously. Recognizing and understanding hormonal fluctuations may help them move through their lives with more awareness and ease.

 

FOUND THIS INTERESTING?

Abby Quillen is an author and marketing strategist who writes about sustainability, gardening, green living, health, business, and other topics. Her work has appeared in The Christian Science Monitor, YES! Magazine, and in dozens of other publications. She lives in Eugene, Oregon with her family.

 

 

 

This article originally appeared on Health Perch

Why You're at Risk for Thyroid Disease After 40

Peri-menopause - the 5-10 years leading up to menopause - is a common time to be diagnosed with a thyroid condition.

In this article, I’d like to address these questions:

• Why then?

• Why more in women?

• What can be done?

Peri-menopause may begin in your late 30s or early or mid 40s.  You may notice that your PMS is worse. You may have spotting between periods. Over time, your periods will likely get more dramatic, with missed periods and heavy periods.  

Other symptoms may be popping up too, like anxiety, brain fog and weight gain. You may be thinking, “these sound like thyroid symptoms,” and you could be right!

But before we explore the thyroid connection, let’s cover what is normally happening during peri-menopause.

What is Peri-menopause?

Peri-menopause is, in short, the opposite of puberty. In puberty your ovaries are waking up to start your reproductive years. Your brain and ovaries are learning to work together to coordinate a monthly cycle, and often the first few reproductive years are hormonally unstable.

In peri-menopause, the brain-ovary relationship is starting to shut down. The ovaries are closing up shop, but the brain keeps knocking at the door, trying to get the shopkeeper working again.   

The sex hormone that needs to rise sufficiently in the first half of the month is estrogen. It is produced by the ovaries as they also grow eggs. If you produce enough estrogen and release an egg, you’ll ovulate.  And if that egg is healthy and hearty, you’ll produce a good amount of progesterone in the second half of your cycle. (The egg sac, or corpus luteum, makes progesterone after ovulation.)

How Your Thyroid Could Be Impacted in Peri-menopause

Even though both estrogen and progesterone are declining in peri-menopause, progesterone declines more dramatically in this stage. This leads to a condition called ‘estrogen dominance.’

Too much estrogen can prevent the thyroid hormone from getting to where it needs to go and can prevent it from converting to its active form. For some women, their thyroid symptoms are simply a result of this high estrogen interfering with thyroid hormone activity.  We’ll talk about how to address estrogen dominance shortly.  

Another thing estrogen effects is the immune system. Estrogen is associated with stimulating the TH2 branch of the immune system (1).  TH2 is short for T Helper cell type 2, a lymphocyte (immune cell). TH2 is part of the adaptive immune system, which mounts a specific attack against pathogens.+  Adaptive immunity is usually a good thing, but it can also lead to autoimmunity if the antigen activity is directed towards itself.

As estrogen is the dominant sex hormone in women, this helps to explain why autoimmunity and thyroid disease is more common in women.  

As we age, we also experience decreased immunity, and a tendency towards TH2 response.  

“In the aged, however, naive cells are less likely to become effectors. In those that do, there is a documented shift towards a Th2 cytokine response.

The elderly have impaired ability to achieve immunization but much higher levels of circulating autoantibodies, (due to the lack of naive effectors) impaired response to viral infections, increased risk of bacterial infections, and increased risk of both neoplastic and autoimmune disease.” (3)

However, there is hope and action we can take to keep estrogen in check!

What To Do

1. Improve Gut Health

If you’ve studied the thyroid, you know that gut health is key to prevent an autoimmune response and to convert thyroid hormone effectively.  Did you know it’s also important to clear estrogen dominance?  One way your gut helps clear estrogen is through the estrobolome, “the aggregate of enteric bacterial genes whose products are capable of metabolizing estrogens.” (4)

You can be friendly to your gut by avoiding:

• Genetically modified foods (GMO) - These kill off friendly bacteria

• Sugars - These feed troublesome bacteria

• Unnecessary antibiotic use - This kills everything, with bacterial imbalance often resulting in its wake

You can be friendly to your gut by including:

• Small amounts of fermented foods like sauerkraut or kimchi

• A wide variety of fibers from salad greens, fresh spices, berries, etc.

• A long period from an early dinner to breakfast - lets your gut bacteria grow in peace!

2. Boost Progesterone

Progesterone helps keep estrogen in check, so boost it by giving your body ingredients to make hormones.

• Hemp Oil - I’ve been very impressed with how 1 T of hemp oil a day helps my own peri-menopausal hormones

• Borage Oil - This oil, usually in pill form, has gamma linoleic acid (GLA) to spark hormone production

• Maca- This adaptogenic root herb helps boosts hormone production and can benefit your energy levels and sex drive

 

3.  Help Out Your Immune System

If aberrant immunity could be a problem in your case, add some components that can balance your TH2 activity:

• Fish Oil- Fish oil has a balancing effect on the immune system and decreases inflammation. (5)  Quality matters with fish oil, so do research to find a good brand.

• Vitamin D- Vitamin D deficiency is found at higher levels in people with autoimmune thyroid disease.  (6) Talk to your doctor about getting your vitamin D tested and restoring it to a level around 60-80 NG/DL through sunshine and vitamin D3 supplementation.

Learn more about the thyroid at perimenopause from experts like Dana Trentini, Dr. Tom O’Bryan and Heather Dubé at the free, online Hormone Balance After 40 Summit!  

The summit happens live June 5-11, 2017, but recordings will live on after the live summit.

Hormone Balance After 40 Part 2 with Dr. Ronda Nelson

We're back for part 2 of the interview with Dr. Ronda Nelson about hormone balance after 40 and dealing with some of the symptoms that can come as result of your hormones changing with age.

Click here to download an mp3 of "Hormone Balance After 40 Part 1 with Dr. Ronda Nelson."

Hormone Balance After 40 Summit

BUY the Hormone Balance After 40 Summit package here!

Hear 32 expert lectures on improving metabolism, balancing moods, increasing sex drive and more!

Here's what you'll hear: 

Min 02:15 The transition from perimenopause to menopause

Min 05:30 Hot flushes & night sweats and when they start showing up

Min 07:00 Why we need to support the ovaries

Min 10:05 Taking care of the adrenals before perimenopause

Min 13:35 Night sweats

Min 16:10 Caring for the hypothalamus

Min 19:00 Benefits of Black cohosh & Sage

Min 20:50 Insomnia & Dr. Nelson's tips to help with sleep

Min 33:10 Irritated bladder problems & dealing with them

Min 39:45 Loss of integrity in the skin & Dr. Nelson’s remedies

 

To learn more about Dr. Ronda Nelson, you can visit her website here and follow her on social media:

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Twitter

Instagram

YouTube

Pinterest

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If you have not yet joined our community, be sure to grab our hidden Hormone stressors quiz here, and come on board!

Hormone Balance After 40 Summit

BUY the Hormone Balance After 40 Summit package here!

Hear 32 expert lectures on improving metabolism, balancing moods, increasing sex drive and more! And if you want to OWN the material, the summit sales package is on sale now for $79 pre-summit, $97 during the summit, and rising to $129 after the summit.  The package includes notes of each talk too and over $800 in bonuses!  Please click here to learn more...

Thanks for listening,

Bridgit Danner, Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

Four Tips for Menopause

When your ovaries are shutting down or have shut down, what is most important is to stabilize and nourish other systems.  You can be more energetic, balanced and joyful when all systems are a go!

So I want to highlight a few key systems to support, and share a tidbit on how to support each one:

1.  Adrenals- These glands will give you your get-up-and-go, and well as help you handle stress.  Tip:  Being fully asleep by 10 PM will allow you to repair these glands on a nightly basis.

2. Pancreas- This gland supports blood sugar handling, and it doesn't appreciate peaks and valleys.  When you jack in with sugars or skipped meals, you can get anxious, fat, fatigued and more.  Tip:  Also choose slow-burning whole starches like sweet potato, quinoa or wild rice.  Avoid processed treats and alcohol.

3.  Liver- Your liver starts the recycling process of hormones, so you want it running smoothly.  Tip:  Support with your liver with foods it likes such as pastured eggs, onion, garlic, brussels sprouts and spinach.

4. Intestines- The recycling/detoxification process continues in the colon, so you want a healthy gut that moves at least every 24 hours.  Tips:  Eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables to feed the friendly bacteria in your gut.  Aim for 20 different types a week!  Walking after a meal is great for digestion too, and it signals to your body to uptake sugars, thus avoiding insulin resistance and weight gain.

Getting older is inevitable, but being tired and miserable is optional!  You may need to learn a few new tricks to stay healthy, but it's totally worth it!

Article by Bridgit Danner, LAc, FDNP

Have you taken our hidden hormone stressors quiz yet?  You can do so here.

The Four Pillars of Happy Perimenopause with Maria Claps

Before you jump into hormone replacement, or get hooked on mood-altering medications during your perimenopausal years, you need to hear out Maria Claps!

Maria is a health coach and functional medicine practitioner who entered full menopause before 50.  But before that, she had a rough ride in perimenopause.  After not sleeping for three full days, she broke down and saw a holistic medical doctor.  Though she got some relief, she didn't get the careful testing and holistic approach she would have liked.

She went on to become an expert on perimenopause, and now sees, primarily, women ages 45-50 who are complaining of fatigue, low libido, weight gain and low mood.

She developed her approach to hormone health, which she calls the 4 pillars.  These include liver care, adrenal support, blood sugar balancing, and hormone testing.

We talk especially about a test we both like, called the Dried Urine Test of Comprehensive Hormones.  This test can save you a lot of grief!

Listen in, and learn about Maria's approach.

For more on Maria, see:

Her program "Balance Your Hormones, Love Your Life" which starts May 2, 2016

Or pick up her free perimenopause guide: http://nourishandflourishhealth.com/

 

Have you joined our online summit yet?  It's free, and preview event start 3/30/16! Sign up at Hormones: A Women's Wellness Summit.

See Maria's demonstration on homemade kombucha below: