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Are You Dangerously Low in Magnesium?

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Without It You Can’t Build Hormones or Clear Toxins

Magnesium deficiency is one of the most overlooked nutrient deficiencies in our modern-day world. Magnesium is not included on nutrition facts labels and is rarely tested for in routine blood work, literally leaving this important mineral “out of sight, out of mind.”

However, shocking new research indicates that up to 50 percent of Americans are deficient in magnesium! (1) This has significant health implications because magnesium is needed to carry out over 300 different biochemical reactions in the body, including those involved in hormone production and detoxification. In fact, the health benefits of magnesium are endless.

Read on to learn about the importance of magnesium for managing stress, building hormones, and promoting detoxification, and which type of magnesium is the most bioavailable in the body. 

Why are We So Deficient in Magnesium?

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body; without it, life would not exist!

However, magnesium deficiency currently afflicts a record number of people in our population. Why have we collectively become so deficient in this critical nutrient? There are five main reasons why many of us are suffering from magnesium deficiency nowadays.                           

  1. Stress
  2. Poor nutrition
  3. Soil depletion
  4. Chronic gut problems
  5. Medications that deplete magnesium

Stress

Our bodies rapidly use up magnesium during times of stress to rev up our nervous systems. Unfortunately, modern-day life is full of stressful activities, many of which we experience daily, such as working and commuting.

To make matters worse, drinking coffee and other caffeinated beverages to help our bodies manage stress and keep up with the daily grind further depletes magnesium.

Given the amount of stress many of us face and the amount of coffee we drink as a nation, it's no wonder we are magnesium deficient!

Poor nutrition

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The Standard American Diet (SAD) is rich in refined flours and junk food that has had most, if not all, of their magnesium removed during processing. In fact, the three “staple foods” of the SAD diet – refined grains, vegetable oils, and sugar – typically have had between 80 and 100 percent of their magnesium removed!

This means that many people are eating a diet that is very low in magnesium. To make matters worse, very few people consume the food sources of magnesium that are naturally rich in magnesium, such as dark leafy greens, legumes, and nuts. 

Nutrient-depleted soils

Research indicates that magnesium content in vegetables has declined between 25-80% over the past 60 years due to increasing nutrient depletion of our soils.

Pesticides used in industrial agriculture kill soil organisms that provide nutrients to plants, and synthetic fertilizers diminish mineral absorption by fruits and vegetables. This leaves us with a product that may look healthy, but is quite nutrient-poor. 

Chronic gut problems

Chronic gut problems, such as small intestinal bacterial growth (SIBO) and leaky gut, compromise magnesium absorption and may lead to magnesium deficiency.

On the flip side, leaky gut can impair magnesium absorption by compromising cell membrane integrity, further exacerbating magnesium deficiency. Unfortunately, leaky gut syndrome is one of the most overlooked health problems.

Medications that deplete magnesium

Antibiotics, diuretics, birth control pills, hormone replacement therapy, antacids, and corticosteroids all deplete magnesium. Considering that 55 percent of Americans regularly take at least one prescription medication, it is no wonder we are magnesium-depleted! (2)

Magnesium Benefits

It is abundantly clear that Americans need more magnesium. Without adequate magnesium, the 300 biochemical processes in the body that rely on this nutrient cannot function properly.

Magnesium deficiency has especially significant implications in the management of stress, hormone production, and detoxification.

Magnesium reduces stress, improves insulin sensitivity, and balances hormones

Always rushing, stressing, and feeling overwhelmed?

Then your body may be using up magnesium at a rapid rate! When the body is under stress, cells dump magnesium into the bloodstream. Prolonged stress thus depletes magnesium, resulting in a deficiency of this critical nutrient. Maybe that’s why magnesium supplements are on demand nowadays.

Fortunately, magnesium supplementation not only replenishes magnesium stores that have been depleted by stress but also helps reduce anxiety in the first place!

Magnesium beneficially modulates a structure called the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis, the body’s primary stress response system. When stress is high, the HPA axis is overactive, resulting in high cortisol and anxiety. Magnesium, on the other hand, reduces over-reactivity of the HPA axis, lowering cortisol and promoting relaxation. (3)(4)

Magnesium regulates insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas that controls the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin resistance is a condition in which continuous exposure to high blood sugar causes cells to become less responsive to insulin. Magnesium deficiency is associated with insulin resistance. (5)

Magnesium supplementation, on the other hand, normalizes insulin secretion and lowers blood sugar, helping to improve insulin sensitivity. (6) Improved insulin sensitivity may, in turn, reduce food cravings and promote sustainable weight loss. In fact, magnesium is so effective at lowering blood sugar that it is often referred to as "nature's metformin!"

Without It You Can’t Build Hormones or Clear Toxins

Magnesium is essential for the production of steroid hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone.

It also helps prevent estrogen dominance by regulating Phase II liver detoxification, a process by which estrogen metabolites are made water-soluble so that the body can excrete them in urine or stool.

A lack of magnesium makes the liver unable to complete Phase II detox, potentially causing estrogen dominance and associated symptoms such as PMS, weight gain, and fluid retention. Magnesium deficiency is linked to PMS, and supplementation may help alleviate PMS symptoms. (7)(8)(9)

Finally, magnesium is required for the production of thyroid hormone. (10) If you are struggling with hypothyroidism despite adequate intake of iodine, selenium, vitamin A, and vitamin D, it may be time to try a magnesium supplement!

Magnesium is required for detoxification

Magnesium plays a crucial role in your body's detoxification processes. It helps in the whole body detoxification that is supported through several mechanisms:

  • Magnesium is involved in the production of ATP, the cellular energy currency that fuels biochemical processes that modify and remove toxins from the body.
  • Optimal magnesium status prevents the accumulation of heavy metals in the body.
  • Magnesium is needed to produce glutathione, the body’s most powerful detoxifier. 

High levels of energy are needed for the function of sodium/potassium ATPase, an enzyme that uses ATP to pump sodium ions from cells and potassium ions into cells. This movement of sodium and potassium is coupled to the movement of nutrients, minerals, and toxins in and out of cells. A lack of magnesium inhibits ATP formation, thus reducing the activity of the ATPase and the processing and removal of toxins.

Research indicates that we are exposed to heavy metals, such as lead and mercury, in ever-increasing amounts due to industrial pollution, contaminated seafood, and dental amalgams. Due to their structural similarity to magnesium, heavy metals preferentially bind to receptors and are incorporated into tissues that generally have an affinity for magnesium.

A deficiency of magnesium leaves you susceptible to heavy metal toxicity and its associated adverse health effects, including fatigue, neurological damage, digestive problems, allergies, depression, and anxiety. This makes it all the more critical that you flood your body with magnesium! An optimal magnesium status will leave less room in your body for heavy metals and prevent the development of heavy metal toxicity. 

Finally, glutathione, the body's most potent natural detoxifier, relies on magnesium for its synthesis. A lack of magnesium lowers glutathione production and inhibits Phase II liver detoxification, the process by which toxins are made water-soluble and prepared for excretion from the body.

How do I know if I’m deficient in magnesium?

If you struggle with chronic stress, eat a diet high in processed foods, take pharmaceutical drugs, or have chronic gut issues, it is fair to say that you may suffer from magnesium deficiency.

However, the best way to clinically confirm magnesium deficiency is with a red blood cell (RBC) magnesium test. Only 1 percent of total body magnesium is extracellular, and it is tightly regulated by many factors, including parathyroid hormone.

RBC magnesium is a better index of magnesium status than serum magnesium because RBCs contain appreciable amounts of magnesium.

How much magnesium do I need?

The Recommended Dietary Allowance for magnesium is 320 mg per day for women; however, many women may need more magnesium, especially if they have gut health issues or are on medications that deplete magnesium. Finding the right dose of magnesium for your body may require a bit of self-experimentation.

What type of magnesium should I take?

There are many types of magnesium supplements available on the market; however, many of them are very poorly absorbed and thus ineffective for rectifying magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium citrate, commonly recommended for those with constipation, and magnesium oxide have very low bioavailability and are not suitable for correcting a deficiency.

The most bioavailable form of magnesium is magnesium bisglycinate, a chelated form that is ideal for those looking to correct a deficiency. We are very excited to offer this product in the form of a magnesium chelate powder that is highly bioavailable, tastes great, and doesn’t cause digestive upset. 

You can also boost your magnesium level by increasing your intake of magnesium-rich foods such as cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy), almonds, hazelnuts, pecans, cashews, dark chocolate, swiss chard, buckwheat, fish, okra, and bananas.

Chelated Magnesium Powder

Make extra magnesium a part of your daily routine.I drink mine while making dinner so that it's a habit. 

Many women need 600 mg of magnesium a day, which is more than your multivitamin contains. Magnesium helps in preventing headaches, menstrual cramps and more.

 

Reversing Chronic Disease with Paleo Habits with Lindsay Christensen

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Lindsay Christensen is a nutritionist, health coach & health writer. She's our new staff writer at WWC. In this episode we talk about Lindsay's chronic childhood illness, diagnosis, the different treatments she's taken and how taking a paleo approach has made a difference for her.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 01:35 Introducing Lindsay Christensen
Min 03:55 Lindsay's health history & recovery
Min 10:35 Lyme infection
Min 14:50 The ancestral approach to healing
Min 19:45 Lindsay's diet
Min 25:05 Being diligent with your health
Min 27:20 The circadian rhythms
Min 36:35 Lindsay's favorite botanicals & binders
Min 41:20 Intermittent fasting
Min 46:00 Lindsay's resources

To learn more about Lindsay Christensen, visit her website here  and follow her on social media:
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Resources:

WWC Supplement Shop 
The Best Supplements for Leaky Gut
Gut Restoration kit

Here's the video version of the interview with Lindsay Christensen:

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To learn more about our private Functional Health Solutions program, please fill out the brief form here. After filling it out, you'll get a short series of emails to teach you about how functional health coaching works, and if it's a fit for you and your case.  As thank you, we provide a discount code at the end of the series for learning about us!

How Toxins Affect Your Weight with Lara Adler

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Lara Adler is an environmental toxins expert who teaches practitioners very detailed information about toxins so that they can share it with their clients. In this episode we talk about how & why toxins affect our weight, ways to reduce toxins in our lives, and childhood obesity.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 02:30 Maintaining healthy body weight
Min 07:10 How toxins & phamaceuticals affect body weight
Min 14:50 Genetics & body weight
Min 19:30 The diet & eating healthy organic food
Min 27:50 Other ways chemicals can trigger weight gain
Min 36:40 Going organic to reduce toxin exposure
Min 39:00 Doing away with plastics & fragrances
Min 44:50 Benefits of filtrating water
Min 55:25 Lara Adler's resources

To learn more about Lara Adler, visit her website here and follow her on social media:
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Resources:

Beautycounter shop - for non-toxic line of beauty products
Tools for Teaching Toxicity
Lara Adler's PDF Guide
Get 50% off our Hormone Summit, Menopause Summit, & Perfect Periods Program by using the code rock2018

And here's the video version of the interview with Lara Adler:

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Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

French Onion Meatball Soup by Maria Emmerich

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Maria Emmerich is a wellness expert in nutrition and exercise physiology who shares a passion for helping others reach their goals of optimal health. 

She recognized that modifying the Ketogentic diet around dietary restrictions can be challenging, so she created this book to meet the need! She includes many delicious recipes that can be enjoyed by those with or without dietary restrictions!

Here's one of Maria Emmerich's recipe from her new book  "Easy Dairy-Free Ketogenic Recipes".

Ingredients:

For the Meatballs:

  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil or lard 1⁄4 cup chopped onions
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 2 tablespoons beef bone broth, homemade (page 106) or store- bought
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 1 large egg

For the Soup:

  • 3 tablespoons avocado oil or lard
  • 2 cups thinly sliced onions
  • 4 cups beef bone broth, homemade (page 106) or store- bought
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves Fine sea salt
  • For Garnish:
  • Fresh thyme leaves
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Prep time: 8 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Yield: 8 servings

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Make the meatballs: Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and season with the salt; sauté until the onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Transfer the onion mixture to a small bowl and set aside to cool.
  3. Combine the ground beef, broth, thyme, and egg in a large bowl. When the onion mixture is no longer hot to the touch, add it to the bowl with the meat mixture and work everything together with your hands.
  4. Shape the meat mixture into 1 1⁄4-inch balls and place on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes or until cooked through.
  5. Meanwhile, make the soup: Heat the oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the sliced onions and sauté for 5 minutes, stirring often, until golden brown. Add the broth and thyme and boil for 10 minutes or until the onions are very soft. Taste and add salt, if desired. Ladle the onion broth into bowls and add the meatballs. Garnish with fresh thyme and freshly ground pepper.
  6. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or freeze in a freezer-safe container for up to a month. To reheat, place the soup in a saucepan over medium heat for a few minutes, until warmed through.

Nutritional info (per serving):
Calories 385
Fat 31g
Protein 22g
Carbs 5g
Ber 1g

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Found This Interesting?

Maria Emmerich is a wellness expert in nutrition and exercise physiology. She shares a passion for helping others reach their goals of optimal health. 

She struggled with her weight throughout childhood and decided enough was enough. She decided to study health and wellness so she could help others stop wasting their time being discouraged with their outward appearance and not feeling their best mentally. Maria understands the connection between food and how it makes us all feel on the inside and out.

She is a International Best Selling author of several books including “Quick and Easy Ketogenic Cooking” "Keto" and “The 30 Day Ketogenic Cleanse“
 

Nutrition for Thyroid Recovery with Caroline Stahlschmidt

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Caroline Stahlschmidt is a Certified Functional Nutrition and Lifestyle Practitioner (FNLP) and is a practicing functional nutritionist at the Functional Nutrition Alliance (FxNA) Clinic. She was diagnosed with Hashimoto's but has learned to thrive with her autoimmunity through diet and lifestyle modifications. In this episode we talk about thyroid, nutrition and advanced issues about thyroid markers.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 00:40 Results of our podcast survey
Min 06:05 Introduction to Caroline Stahlschmidt & her Hashimoto's diagnosis
Min 08:15 Factors that contributed to Caroline's Hashimoto's
Min 10:00 Unhealthy guts & your poop
Min 13:30 High TSH levels
Min 19:00 The Epstein Barr virus
Min 22:00 Caroline's evolution of symptoms
Min 26:40 Getting enough sleep & rest
Min 31:55 Nutrition & diet for good health
Min 41:05 Yoga & Caroline's healing journey
Min 47:05 Caroline's resources & work

To learn more about Caroline Stahlschmidt and the Functional Nutrition Alliance (FxNA) Clinic, visit their website here and follow them on social media:
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Pinterest 
YouTube 

 

Podcast Survey

The podcast survey prize winners are:

  1. Laura
  2. Erika
  3. Nicole

Resources:

Free ebook (Food/Mood/Poop) 
Beautycounter - non-toxic line of beauty products

Get 50% off our Hormone SummitMenopause Summit, & Perfect Periods Program by using the code rock2018

Here's the video version of the interview with Caroline:

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If you have not yet joined our community, be sure take our "Is a Gut Infection Causing Your Hormonal Imbalance" quiz here, and come on board!

We have lots of valuable, free resources for women's health we share weekly.

Bridgit Danner,

Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

Why Detox Beats Dieting with Robyn Openshaw

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Robyn Openshaw is a researcher and wellness author of 15 titles, including 2017’s #1 bestseller Vibe, The Green Smoothies Diet, and 12 Steps to Whole Foods. She's our first guest this year where we talk about detox, toxins, dieting and eating healthy.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 02:15 Introduction to Robyn Openshaw & her new book "Vibe"
Min 07:30 Toxic load in the body
Min 09:40 Robyn's health history & her grandma's fight with cancer
Min 12:25 Robyn's first detox experience
Min 18:35 The 26 Day Detox program
Min 23:05 Taking green smoothies
Min 28:45 The Ketogenic diet
Min 35:20 The Paleo diet, carbs & protein
Min 45:20 Intuitive eating & detoxing
Min 50:30 Why detox is better than dieting
Min 52:05 Fulic acid, humic acid & minerals

To learn more about Robyn Openshaw, visit her website here and follow her on social media:
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Twitter 
Instagram 
YouTube 
Pinterest 

Resources:

Free Detox Video Mini Masterclass 
12 Steps to Whole Foods Masterclass 
How Not to Die by Michael Greger, MD
Eat to Live by Joel Fuhrman, MD

Here's the video version of the interview with Robyn Openshaw:

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

If you have not yet joined our community, be sure take our "Is a Gut Infection Causing Your Hormonal Imbalance" quiz here, and come on board!

We have lots of valuable, free resources for women's health we share weekly.

Bridgit Danner,

Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative

Macronutrient Balance and Traditional Cooking for Weight Management with Wardee Harmon

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Wardee Harmon is the founder of Traditional Cooking School and author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods. In this episode we focus on weight management, macronutrient balanced diets, traditional cooking and sourcing healthy foods.

Here's what you'll hear:

Min 03:00 Introduction to Wardee Harmon
Min 06:00 Re-evaluating how we eat
Min 13:30 Eating low-carb & restricted diets
Min 16:25 Energizing vs satisfying dishes
Min 18:55 The concept of traditional cooking
Min 26:30 What foods to eat at home
Min 28:20 Learning how to cook traditional foods
Min 36:15 Wardee's programs
Min 39:30 Sourcing healthy food
Min 42:00 Wardee's menu plan & home cooking tips

To learn more about Wardee Harmon and Traditional Cooking School, visit her website here and follow her on social media:

Facebook

Instagram

Pinterest

YouTube

Twitter

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Resources:

Sourdough bread
Wardee Harmon's FREE 1-week menu plan
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Fermenting Foods

Take our survey here for a chance to win a price

Here's a video version of the interview with Wardee Harmon:

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Thanks for listening!

Bridgit Danner, LAc, FDNP

Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative