Sleep quality

Ease Anxiety & Support Immunity in a Disaster with Mira Dessy

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Mira Dessy is the Ingredient Guru and a Houston area resident whose home was flooded in Hurricane Harvey. She is a practicing holistic nutritionist and meditation expert.

She’ll share both how she remediated her home and some of the emotional and physical health challenges she handled with nutrition, supplements and mindfulness.

We cover:

  • The DIY actions she is taking to restore her home

  • How a community can come together in a crisis

  • The symptoms she’s noticing right after the hurricane

  • The emotional toll of losing your possessions and your home

  • How even junky food, given with love, can be nourishing!

  • How to kick a sugar habit if you’ve relied on it through a disaster

  • The supplements Mira uses to stay healthy

  • How quick and simple meditations can help for sleep and stress

Resources

Download notes from this interview HERE.

Get Mira Dessy's free ebook: Eating Out Healthy

Moisture Meter - to make sure all surfaces are dry enough before beginning the rebuilding process.

To learn more about Mira Dessy, visit her website here and follow her on social  media:

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You can listen to this and all other episodes on the podcast or watch directly on our YouTube channel here.

 

Please enjoy these articles from our friends Trudy Scott from Every Woman Over 29 and Jodi Cohen of Vibrant Blue Oils:

Nutrition Solutions for Psychological Stress After a Natural Disaster

3 Steps to Combating Mold with Essential Oils

Essential Oils to Modulate the Toxic Effects of Mold

Tomorrow we’ll have our final day of Mold Week with Ryan James, teaching you how to get the most out of an insurance claim.  Home remediation can be quite costly; let Ryan keep you from getting the short end of the stick from your insurance company.

Audio-Only Version

If you are on-the-go or have a poor internet connection, it will be more reliable to play the following audio-only version.

Free Guide: Healing from Toxic Mold

You want help for your mold symptoms ASAP! Cut to the chase with this straight-forward guide, outlining my favorite supplements for detoxing mold. As a person who has been healing from mold toxicity, I can personally say these supplements support my daily self-care effectively.

Let me help you start healing!

Bridgit Danner, LAc, FDNP
Founder of Hormone Detox Shop

How to Tackle Hormonal Mood Swings by Abby Quillen

There are certain body processes that are not under our control. Take hormones, for example: For women, essentials such as estrogen and progesterone help to regulate things like reproduction, growth, and metabolism. They’re necessary, and their levels are not something that anyone can regulate.

Hormones may cause women to feel differently based on different levels, but those changes do not have to be something that happens without awareness. In fact, understanding what’s going on in the body and why it’s happening is a good way to feel and be more in control.

Take menopause: Many women are taught to fear it because of how radically the body changes hormone levels. But in fact, many women experience menopause as a positive phase of life. Even so, it’s helpful to understand what negativity may happen and what women can do to understand it. This graphic helps explain those hormone fluctuations.
 

The Balancing Act

If you feel like your hormones are holding you hostage, here are some relatively simple lifestyle changes that may help.

1. Pay attention

Keep a diary of your symptoms for a few months. Every woman is different, and the only way to understand your moods is to record them and analyze the data. It may bring relief to observe that cyclical annoyances don’t usually last long.

2. Eat up

Studies suggest that women with PMS may be deficient in calcium and magnesium.

According to some experts, foods rich in vitamin B6, omega 3 fatty acids and zinc may help prevent mood swings. It can’t hurt to eat a more nutrient-dense diet. Reach for vegetables, leafy greens, beans, seeds, nuts, legumes, whole grains, poultry, seafood, seaweed and fish.

3. Improve your sleep habits

Some women report insomnia before menstruation, which is when estrogen and progesterone levels plummet. 40 to 50 percent of women experience insomnia during menopause. Women with sleep disturbances are more likely to feel stressed out, tense, anxious, or depressed. To improve your odds of a good night of sleep, make your room dark, quiet, and cool, and stick to routine sleep and waking times.

4. Move more

In one study, eight weeks of aerobic training significantly reduced participants’ premenstrual symptoms. Choose physical activities you enjoy since the point is to feel good.

5. Manage stress

Women who experience stress early in a menstrual cycle are more likely to experience mood swings later in the cycle, according to a study. Walking, mindfulness exercises, visiting nature, and hanging out with friends are proven ways to reduce stress.

6. Reduce caffeine and alcohol

In studies, caffeine has been shown to decrease feelings of relaxation and increase ratings of anxiousness, tenseness, and nervousness. Alcohol may interfere with estrogen detoxification (which could be why it’s associated with a higher risk of breast cancer). So reach for a drink such as water or herbal tea that will help you feel calm.

If you experience mood swings that interfere with your daily life and these healthy makeovers don’t help, it may be time to check in with your doctor or naturopath. Herbs like chaste tree and red clover, vitamin supplements or medical treatments may help.

Conclusion

Hormonal cycles should not be used to discount or discriminate against women or medicalize normal life changes. However, it doesn’t serve women to pretend their bodies and moods stay constant through the course of their lifetime. Whether the subject is menstruation, menopause, or moods, they should take their health seriously. Recognizing and understanding hormonal fluctuations may help them move through their lives with more awareness and ease.

 

FOUND THIS INTERESTING?

Abby Quillen is an author and marketing strategist who writes about sustainability, gardening, green living, health, business, and other topics. Her work has appeared in The Christian Science Monitor, YES! Magazine, and in dozens of other publications. She lives in Eugene, Oregon with her family.

 

 

 

This article originally appeared on Health Perch

Sleep Science with Brodie Welch & Dr. Michael Breus

Brodie Welch is an acupuncturist in the state of Oregon and host of the podcast ‘A Healthy Curiosity’. In this episode she's hosting Dr. Michael Breus who is a sleep expert to talk about all things sleep.

Click here to download an mp3 of "Sleep science with Brodie Welch & Michael Breus"

Here's what you'll hear: 

Min 02:10 Introduction to Dr. Michael Breus
Min 03:30 Effects of sleep on the metabolic process
Min 05:40 The sleep & weight loss connection
Min 07:00 How much sleep do you need?
Min 09:00 Sleep deprivation & its effects on the body
Min 12:30 The 4 chronotypes & the optimal time to go to bed
Min 15:50 Chronic sleep problems
Min 18:20 5 Tips to improve sleep quality
Min 24:20 Blue-light screens and melatonin
Min 28:40 Myths about sleep

To learn more about Dr. Michael Breus, you can find him on his website here or follow him on social media:

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Brodie Welch is the host of the podcast ‘A Healthy Curiosity’. You can find her on her website here or follow her on social media:

Facebook

Twitter

Resources: 

The Power of When Quiz - to find out your chronotype

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If you have not yet joined our community, be sure to grab our hidden Hormone stressors quiz here, and come on board!

This episode was originally featured on Brodie Welch's podcast "A Healthy Curiosity" here.

 

Thanks for listening,

Bridgit Danner, Founder of Women's Wellness Collaborative